Posts under ‘5. Interior Details’

Loft

February 14th, 2010 by KTU | No Comments | Filed in 5. Interior Details

I put a simple loft at a height of 7 1/2 feet in the back half of the structure. This is a cozy space, which my kids love.

I planed the top edges of 2x6 rough-sawn hemlock for the loft deck boards.


The loft from below. I deliberately left the bottoms of these boards rough and weathered. I like the look.

The Morso 1410 Woodstove

February 14th, 2010 by KTU | 1 Comment | Filed in 5. Interior Details

I had experimented with propane space heaters and concluded that I needed somewhere between 10,000 and 30,000 btu/hr of power to keep the Mini Cabin warm in the dead of winter, when temperatures drop below 0 F. (Specifically, I found I could maintain 30F temperature difference between inside and outside at 10,000 BTU/hour. BTW, for the non-US reader, 10,000 btu/hr is about 3 kw.) I also reasoned that I could always open an upper window if things got too toasty. Still, 30,000 BTU/hr is a very small wood stove. So, I went looking for the smallest nice woodstove on the market. I chose the Morso 1410.

The Morso 1410 (aka Squirrel) installed and keeping the shed toasty.

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Marmoleum “Click”

April 25th, 2010 by KTU | 3 Comments | Filed in 5. Interior Details, Notes on Approaches, Vermont Mini Cabin

I chose Forbo Marmoleum for the mini cabin floor. I’ve used Marmoleum in two other projects– my church house kitchen (twice actually) and in a commercial project at work. I like the material quite a lot. Marmoleum is a trade name for  a type of linoleum, which is a composite sheet material made from sawdust, linseed oil, dyes, and a jute backing. It is very forgiving, durable, and comes in a lot of funky colors. The sheet version comes in a 2 meter wide roll, which is really the only weakness of that form, requiring seams for most applications. The material is very heavy, so I knew I couldn’t haul a roll down the trail. Fortunately, the material comes in tiles, which are roughly 1 ft. x 3 ft. This version is called Marmoleum Click, because the tiles are supposed to click together.

The finished Marmoleum Click floor.

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